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The Realm Within

The Realm Within
Typearchon
Requires AR29
Is Part ofChapter I: Act II
DescriptionAfter identifying Rex Lapis' preferred scent, Zhongli sends you to Yujing Terrace to seek out an old friend of his, Madame Ping, and borrow a certain Cleansing Bell. Strange... Zhongli seems to be avoiding his old friend...
Prev Quest(s)Next Quest(s)
Three Poignant Perfumes
Downtown
RequiresThree Poignant Perfumes
UnlocksDowntown
Rewards
Adventure EXP x 575
Mora x 19800
Adventurer's Experience x 7
Mystic Enhancement Ore x 4
Objectives & Dialogues (are clickable)
• Talk to Madame Ping
Madame Ping
Madame Ping: All things must change...
Madame Ping: Mm? Youngster, are you here to admire the flowers?
Madame Ping: But it's a shame. These Glaze Lilies have almost all wilted...
Paimon: What happened to them?
Madame Ping: Back in my day, people said that Glaze Lilies can read human hearts.
Madame Ping: If they heard beautiful sounds like laughter and singing, they would also bloom joyfully.
Madame Ping: But if they heard too much wild gossip or slander, they would quickly wither away.
Paimon: ...So that means these flowers feel what's happening in Liyue.
Madame Ping: Yes, the rumors of Rex Lapis' death are no small matter. They are everywhere.
Madame Ping: Some say it was a Fatui plot. Others say that the Qixing made it all up, and still others think that That Which Lies in the Deep is breaking free.
Madame Ping: This harbor is like a mountain of dry tinder. One spark and the fire will consume us all.
Madame Ping: ...Well, I shall say no more. This old woman's grown too old and naggy... Did you have something to say, youngster?
Madame Ping: Ah, that old trinket... I remember it being here with me, but I've grown old. I can't quite recall where it is exactly.
Madame Ping: An old friend of mine used to wear it on his person, back when I was young...
Madame Ping: He saw me gazing at it often and gave it to me.
Madame Ping: But he told me then that if someone should come to borrow that bell, I should not be loath to part with it.
Madame Ping: It has been many years, and who knows how many times someone has come to borrow this bell.
Madame Ping: Still, though I can't recall when it started, it's been a long time since anyone has come to borrow it.
Madame Ping: Ah, these old bones are so slow to look for things. I doubt you can wait that long...
Paimon: That's right granny. We'll follow you back home, and search for it ourselves!
Paimon: And... Um, we can help with chores if you have any too!
Madame Ping: Alright, children, there is no need to worry. I didn't place the bell very far away.
Paimon: Eh? Do you live near here, granny? Whoa, but this is Yujing Terrace. It's gotta be expensive!
Madame Ping: Haha, an old lady like me can't afford to buy a place in this city. See this ceramic teapot? My entire household is in here.
Paimon: ...How does that work?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: Hey, that's rude!
Paimon: ...And even if it was like that, it must be a very expensive bell, right granny?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What!? There's no way Paimon would fit in there!
Paimon: And why do you need Paimon to go in, anyway? Can't you just lift the lid and look inside?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What a weird thing to be proud of...
Madame Ping: Alright, children, there is no need to worry. I didn't place the bell very far away.
Paimon: Eh? Do you live near here, granny? Whoa, but this is Yujing Terrace. It's gotta be expensive!
Madame Ping: Haha, an old lady like me can't afford to buy a place in this city. See this ceramic teapot? My entire household is in here.
Paimon: ...How does that work?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: Hey, that's rude!
Paimon: ...And even if it was like that, it must be a very expensive bell, right granny?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What!? There's no way Paimon would fit in there!
Paimon: And why do you need Paimon to go in, anyway? Can't you just lift the lid and look inside?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Madame Ping: Borrow something? ...Oh, you've come to borrow the Cleansing Bell, yes?
Madame Ping: Apart from that, I don't have anything of value that you youngsters might want.
Madame Ping: But it was not originally mine, either. That trinket used to belong to a friend of mine.
Madame Ping: I was a vain beauty when I was young, and I would pester him for that bell all the time.
Madame Ping: He could not dissuade me, and so he gave it to me. But he said that if someone should come to borrow it, I must not be loath to give it away.
Madame Ping: It has been many years, and who knows how many times someone has come to borrow this bell.
Madame Ping: Still, though I can't recall when it started, it's been a long time since anyone has come to borrow it.
Madame Ping: Ah, these old bones are so slow to look for things. I doubt you can wait that long...
Paimon: That's right granny. We'll follow you back home, and search for it ourselves!
Paimon: And... Um, we can help with chores if you have any too!
Madame Ping: Alright, children, there is no need to worry. I didn't place the bell very far away.
Paimon: Eh? Do you live near here, granny? Whoa, but this is Yujing Terrace. It's gotta be expensive!
Madame Ping: Haha, an old lady like me can't afford to buy a place in this city. See this ceramic teapot? My entire household is in here.
Paimon: ...How does that work?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: Hey, that's rude!
Paimon: ...And even if it was like that, it must be a very expensive bell, right granny?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What!? There's no way Paimon would fit in there!
Paimon: And why do you need Paimon to go in, anyway? Can't you just lift the lid and look inside?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What a weird thing to be proud of...
Madame Ping: Alright, children, there is no need to worry. I didn't place the bell very far away.
Paimon: Eh? Do you live near here, granny? Whoa, but this is Yujing Terrace. It's gotta be expensive!
Madame Ping: Haha, an old lady like me can't afford to buy a place in this city. See this ceramic teapot? My entire household is in here.
Paimon: ...How does that work?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: Hey, that's rude!
Paimon: ...And even if it was like that, it must be a very expensive bell, right granny?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What!? There's no way Paimon would fit in there!
Paimon: And why do you need Paimon to go in, anyway? Can't you just lift the lid and look inside?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Madame Ping: It's nothing, it's nothing. I just thought it a great shame that so many of these Glaze Lilies have wilted.
Paimon: What happened to them?
Madame Ping: Back in my day, people said that Glaze Lilies can read human hearts.
Madame Ping: If they heard beautiful sounds like laughter and singing, they would also bloom joyfully.
Madame Ping: But if they heard too much wild gossip or slander, they would quickly wither away.
Paimon: ...So that means these flowers feel what's happening in Liyue.
Madame Ping: Yes, the rumors of Rex Lapis' death are no small matter. They are everywhere.
Madame Ping: Some say it was a Fatui plot. Others say that the Qixing made it all up, and still others think that That Which Lies in the Deep is breaking free.
Madame Ping: This harbor is like a mountain of dry tinder. One spark and the fire will consume us all.
Madame Ping: ...Well, I shall say no more. This old woman's grown too old and naggy... Did you have something to say, youngster?
Madame Ping: Ah, that old trinket... I remember it being here with me, but I've grown old. I can't quite recall where it is exactly.
Madame Ping: An old friend of mine used to wear it on his person, back when I was young...
Madame Ping: He saw me gazing at it often and gave it to me.
Madame Ping: But he told me then that if someone should come to borrow that bell, I should not be loath to part with it.
Madame Ping: It has been many years, and who knows how many times someone has come to borrow this bell.
Madame Ping: Still, though I can't recall when it started, it's been a long time since anyone has come to borrow it.
Madame Ping: Ah, these old bones are so slow to look for things. I doubt you can wait that long...
Paimon: That's right granny. We'll follow you back home, and search for it ourselves!
Paimon: And... Um, we can help with chores if you have any too!
Madame Ping: Alright, children, there is no need to worry. I didn't place the bell very far away.
Paimon: Eh? Do you live near here, granny? Whoa, but this is Yujing Terrace. It's gotta be expensive!
Madame Ping: Haha, an old lady like me can't afford to buy a place in this city. See this ceramic teapot? My entire household is in here.
Paimon: ...How does that work?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: Hey, that's rude!
Paimon: ...And even if it was like that, it must be a very expensive bell, right granny?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What!? There's no way Paimon would fit in there!
Paimon: And why do you need Paimon to go in, anyway? Can't you just lift the lid and look inside?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What a weird thing to be proud of...
Madame Ping: Alright, children, there is no need to worry. I didn't place the bell very far away.
Paimon: Eh? Do you live near here, granny? Whoa, but this is Yujing Terrace. It's gotta be expensive!
Madame Ping: Haha, an old lady like me can't afford to buy a place in this city. See this ceramic teapot? My entire household is in here.
Paimon: ...How does that work?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: Hey, that's rude!
Paimon: ...And even if it was like that, it must be a very expensive bell, right granny?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What!? There's no way Paimon would fit in there!
Paimon: And why do you need Paimon to go in, anyway? Can't you just lift the lid and look inside?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Madame Ping: Borrow something? ...Oh, you've come to borrow the Cleansing Bell, yes?
Madame Ping: Apart from that, I don't have anything of value that you youngsters might want.
Madame Ping: But it was not originally mine, either. That trinket used to belong to a friend of mine.
Madame Ping: I was a vain beauty when I was young, and I would pester him for that bell all the time.
Madame Ping: He could not dissuade me, and so he gave it to me. But he said that if someone should come to borrow it, I must not be loath to give it away.
Madame Ping: It has been many years, and who knows how many times someone has come to borrow this bell.
Madame Ping: Still, though I can't recall when it started, it's been a long time since anyone has come to borrow it.
Madame Ping: Ah, these old bones are so slow to look for things. I doubt you can wait that long...
Paimon: That's right granny. We'll follow you back home, and search for it ourselves!
Paimon: And... Um, we can help with chores if you have any too!
Madame Ping: Alright, children, there is no need to worry. I didn't place the bell very far away.
Paimon: Eh? Do you live near here, granny? Whoa, but this is Yujing Terrace. It's gotta be expensive!
Madame Ping: Haha, an old lady like me can't afford to buy a place in this city. See this ceramic teapot? My entire household is in here.
Paimon: ...How does that work?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: Hey, that's rude!
Paimon: ...And even if it was like that, it must be a very expensive bell, right granny?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What!? There's no way Paimon would fit in there!
Paimon: And why do you need Paimon to go in, anyway? Can't you just lift the lid and look inside?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What a weird thing to be proud of...
Madame Ping: Alright, children, there is no need to worry. I didn't place the bell very far away.
Paimon: Eh? Do you live near here, granny? Whoa, but this is Yujing Terrace. It's gotta be expensive!
Madame Ping: Haha, an old lady like me can't afford to buy a place in this city. See this ceramic teapot? My entire household is in here.
Paimon: ...How does that work?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: Hey, that's rude!
Paimon: ...And even if it was like that, it must be a very expensive bell, right granny?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
Paimon: What!? There's no way Paimon would fit in there!
Paimon: And why do you need Paimon to go in, anyway? Can't you just lift the lid and look inside?
Madame Ping: Hohoho, youngsters. I simply mean that the bell is somewhere inside this teapot, and you are quite welcome to borrow it — if you can find it.
• Touch Madame Ping's teapot
Madame Ping
Madame Ping: Aren't you youngsters in a hurry to find that bell? Hop to it, then.
Madame Ping: But be careful, I haven't cleaned this place up in a long time.
Madame Ping: If you were to get dirt on your beautiful clothes, it would take some work to clean up.
Touch the teapotTouch the teapot: Touch the teapot:
• Search for the Cleansing Bell
• Talk to Madame Ping
Madame Ping
Madame Ping: Ho-ho, in and out in no time... You youngsters really are quick.
Madame Ping: An adeptus... I haven't heard anyone say those words in earnest for a long time.
Madame Ping: As to whether I am one or not, child, surely you already understand?
Paimon: Ugh... Paimon kinda knows what you mean, but is also kinda confused. Are you really giving us the bell just like that Granny?
Paimon: Don't you think it's weird? Something's just happened to Rex Lapis, and then we come running up asking for it...
Madame Ping: Oh, don't be silly. Liyue Harbor has been through a great deal in its history. In that time, it has seen the departure of countless adepti.
Madame Ping: But no matter what, we have always performed the Rite of Parting first before any other matters.
Madame Ping: To cry "catch the murderer!" at the top of one's lungs, but ignore the Rite of Parting... That, to me, is what is wrong-headed.
Madame Ping: Now that you have come to borrow the bell, I guess that perhaps an old friend of mine has finally decided to take matters into their own hands.
Madame Ping: So, why would I be unwilling to lend you the bell?
Madame Ping: Oh? Well, if it came to that... Haha, they would find a certain old lady knocking at their door.
Madame Ping: We haven't met in a while anyway, it would be nice to share a drink and chat.
Madame Ping: Well, you must have things to do. Since you have the bell, you should return.
Madame Ping: Oh, and, do tell the person who sent you...
Madame Ping: ...that if they have time, they can come over for tea. I don't have much to offer, but you can always count on an old lady for a pot of tea.
Paimon: We will! Thanks, granny!
Paimon: Hey! It belongs to granny! We're supposed to return what we borrow!
Madame Ping: Let you keep it? Haha, you really are a frank child. If you want it, you can keep it.
Madame Ping: But this bell gets homesick sometimes. Who knows, it might find its way back into these old hands...
Madame Ping: Well, you must have things to do. Since you have the bell, you should return.
Madame Ping: Oh, and, do tell the person who sent you...
Madame Ping: ...that if they have time, they can come over for tea. I don't have much to offer, but you can always count on an old lady for a pot of tea.
Paimon: We will! Thanks, granny!
Madame Ping: The Qixing... Those children stopped letting my friends and I into their counsel long ago.
Madame Ping: Still, they've done well recently. We old folks are content to be idle.
Paimon: Ugh... Paimon kinda knows what you mean, but is also kinda confused. Are you really giving us the bell just like that Granny?
Paimon: Don't you think it's weird? Something's just happened to Rex Lapis, and then we come running up asking for it...
Madame Ping: Oh, don't be silly. Liyue Harbor has been through a great deal in its history. In that time, it has seen the departure of countless adepti.
Madame Ping: But no matter what, we have always performed the Rite of Parting first before any other matters.
Madame Ping: To cry "catch the murderer!" at the top of one's lungs, but ignore the Rite of Parting... That, to me, is what is wrong-headed.
Madame Ping: Now that you have come to borrow the bell, I guess that perhaps an old friend of mine has finally decided to take matters into their own hands.
Madame Ping: So, why would I be unwilling to lend you the bell?
Madame Ping: Oh? Well, if it came to that... Haha, they would find a certain old lady knocking at their door.
Madame Ping: We haven't met in a while anyway, it would be nice to share a drink and chat.
Madame Ping: Well, you must have things to do. Since you have the bell, you should return.
Madame Ping: Oh, and, do tell the person who sent you...
Madame Ping: ...that if they have time, they can come over for tea. I don't have much to offer, but you can always count on an old lady for a pot of tea.
Paimon: We will! Thanks, granny!
Paimon: Hey! It belongs to granny! We're supposed to return what we borrow!
Madame Ping: Let you keep it? Haha, you really are a frank child. If you want it, you can keep it.
Madame Ping: But this bell gets homesick sometimes. Who knows, it might find its way back into these old hands...
Madame Ping: Well, you must have things to do. Since you have the bell, you should return.
Madame Ping: Oh, and, do tell the person who sent you...
Madame Ping: ...that if they have time, they can come over for tea. I don't have much to offer, but you can always count on an old lady for a pot of tea.
Paimon: We will! Thanks, granny!
Madame Ping: The Fatui? Hah! Child, what goes on in that mind of yours, I wonder?
Madame Ping: I'm far too old to be quibbling with them.
Madame Ping: But if they overreach themselves, I will do what I must.
Paimon: Ugh... Paimon kinda knows what you mean, but is also kinda confused. Are you really giving us the bell just like that Granny?
Paimon: Don't you think it's weird? Something's just happened to Rex Lapis, and then we come running up asking for it...
Madame Ping: Oh, don't be silly. Liyue Harbor has been through a great deal in its history. In that time, it has seen the departure of countless adepti.
Madame Ping: But no matter what, we have always performed the Rite of Parting first before any other matters.
Madame Ping: To cry "catch the murderer!" at the top of one's lungs, but ignore the Rite of Parting... That, to me, is what is wrong-headed.
Madame Ping: Now that you have come to borrow the bell, I guess that perhaps an old friend of mine has finally decided to take matters into their own hands.
Madame Ping: So, why would I be unwilling to lend you the bell?
Madame Ping: Oh? Well, if it came to that... Haha, they would find a certain old lady knocking at their door.
Madame Ping: We haven't met in a while anyway, it would be nice to share a drink and chat.
Madame Ping: Well, you must have things to do. Since you have the bell, you should return.
Madame Ping: Oh, and, do tell the person who sent you...
Madame Ping: ...that if they have time, they can come over for tea. I don't have much to offer, but you can always count on an old lady for a pot of tea.
Paimon: We will! Thanks, granny!
Paimon: Hey! It belongs to granny! We're supposed to return what we borrow!
Madame Ping: Let you keep it? Haha, you really are a frank child. If you want it, you can keep it.
Madame Ping: But this bell gets homesick sometimes. Who knows, it might find its way back into these old hands...
Madame Ping: Well, you must have things to do. Since you have the bell, you should return.
Madame Ping: Oh, and, do tell the person who sent you...
Madame Ping: ...that if they have time, they can come over for tea. I don't have much to offer, but you can always count on an old lady for a pot of tea.
Paimon: We will! Thanks, granny!
• Put the perfume and Cleansing Bell in place
Zhongli
Zhongli: Indeed, this is the Cleansing Bell. Hmm, it's in good condition.
Zhongli: Let's place the perfume we've prepared inside.
Zhongli: Of course. How would I know that the bell was with her, otherwise?
Paimon: That's suspicious! But if you don't want to talk about it, we won't pry.
Paimon: Oh, yes! That old granny asked us to tell you something.
Paimon: "If you have the time, you can come over for tea. I don't have much to offer, but you can always count on an old lady for a pot of tea."
Zhongli: Ha, that tone does not suit you. Still, her teapot is indeed very good. There are none better for brewing tea.
Zhongli: When a suitable time arrives, I'll bring a spot of fine tea and pay her a visit.
Paimon: So, what's the next step in our preparations?
Zhongli: Hmm... Next, we need to purchase kites.
Paimon: Ooh! Paimon loves kites! Are you taking us kite flying? Is this our break time?
Zhongli: Haha, no, no. Kites are children's toys, yes, but they also play various symbolic roles in Liyue's rituals.
Zhongli: I will explain it to you. But our next course of action should probably be to purchase the kites first.
Paimon: Oh, sure... curiouser and curiouser...
Zhongli: An adeptus...
Paimon: That's suspicious! But if you don't want to talk about it, we won't pry.
Paimon: Oh, yes! That old granny asked us to tell you something.
Paimon: "If you have the time, you can come over for tea. I don't have much to offer, but you can always count on an old lady for a pot of tea."
Zhongli: Ha, that tone does not suit you. Still, her teapot is indeed very good. There are none better for brewing tea.
Zhongli: When a suitable time arrives, I'll bring a spot of fine tea and pay her a visit.
Paimon: So, what's the next step in our preparations?
Zhongli: Hmm... Next, we need to purchase kites.
Paimon: Ooh! Paimon loves kites! Are you taking us kite flying? Is this our break time?
Zhongli: Haha, no, no. Kites are children's toys, yes, but they also play various symbolic roles in Liyue's rituals.
Zhongli: I will explain it to you. But our next course of action should probably be to purchase the kites first.
Paimon: Oh, sure... curiouser and curiouser...
Madame Ping
Madame Ping: It seems my old friends just can't stand idly by anymore.
Madame Ping: Let's just hope nothing messy comes of this.

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